Mark A Reinecke Feinberg School of Medicine, Feinberg Clinical, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Mark A Reinecke

Research Interest Keywords

Adolescents, Anxiety Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, Child and Adolescent psychiatry, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Depression, Depression, Dysthymia, Mood Disorders, Mood Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Panic Disorder, Personality Diso

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The treatment for adolescents with depression study (TADS): Outcomes over 1 year of naturalistic follow-up

John March; Susan Silva; John Curry; Karen Wells; John Fairbank; Barbara Burns; Marisa Domino; Benedetto Vitiello; Joanne Severe; Charles Casat; et al.

(Profiled Author: Mark A Reinecke)

American Journal of Psychiatry. 2009;166(10):1141-1149.

Abstract

Objective: The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) evaluates the effectiveness of fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and their combination in adolescents with major depressive disorder. The authors report effectiveness outcomes across a 1-year naturalistic follow-up period. Method: The randomized, controlled trial was conducted in 13 academic and community sites in the United States. Stages I, II, and III consisted of 12, 6, and 18 weeks of acute, consolidation, and continuation treatment, respectively. Following discontinuation of TADS treatments at the end of stage III, stage IV consisted of 1 year of naturalistic follow-up. The participants were 327 subjects between the ages of 12 and 17 with a primary DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder. No TADS treatment was provided during the follow-up period; treatment was available in the community. The primary dependent measures, rated by an independent evaluator blind to treatment status, were the total score on the Children's Depression Rating Scale - Revised and the rate of response, defined as a rating of much or very much improved on the Clinical Global Impressions improvement measure. Results: Sixty-six percent of the eligible subjects participated in at least one stage IV assessment. The benefits seen at the end of active treatment (week 36) persisted during follow-up on all measures of depression and suicidality. Conclusions: In contrast to earlier reports on short-term treatments, in which worsening after treatment is the rule, the longer treatment in the TADS was associated with persistent benefits over 1 year of naturalistic follow-up.


PMID: 19723787    

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