Mark A Reinecke Feinberg School of Medicine, Feinberg Clinical, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Mark A Reinecke

Research Interest Keywords

Adolescents, Anxiety Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, Child and Adolescent psychiatry, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Depression, Depression, Dysthymia, Mood Disorders, Mood Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Panic Disorder, Personality Diso

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Social problem-solving among adolescents treated for depression

Emily G. Becker-Weidman; Rachel H. Jacobs; Mark A. Reinecke; Susan G. Silva; John S. March

(Profiled Author: Mark A Reinecke)

Behaviour Research and Therapy. 2010;48(1):11-18.

Abstract

Studies suggest that deficits in social problem-solving may be associated with increased risk of depression and suicidality in children and adolescents. It is unclear, however, which specific dimensions of social problem-solving are related to depression and suicidality among youth. Moreover, rational problem-solving strategies and problem-solving motivation may moderate or predict change in depression and suicidality among children and adolescents receiving treatment. The effect of social problem-solving on acute treatment outcomes were explored in a randomized controlled trial of 439 clinically depressed adolescents enrolled in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Measures included the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R), the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire - Grades 7-9 (SIQ-Jr), and the Social Problem-Solving Inventory-Revised (SPSI-R). A random coefficients regression model was conducted to examine main and interaction effects of treatment and SPSI-R subscale scores on outcomes during the 12-week acute treatment stage. Negative problem orientation, positive problem orientation, and avoidant problem-solving style were non-specific predictors of depression severity. In terms of suicidality, avoidant problem-solving style and impulsiveness/carelessness style were predictors, whereas negative problem orientation and positive problem orientation were moderators of treatment outcome. Implications of these findings, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PMID: 19775677     PMCID: PMC2812620    

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