Jennifer Anne Richeson Judd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, Weinberg Social Sciences, Psychology

Jennifer Anne Richeson

    Judd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences
    Weinberg Social Sciences
    Psychology
    Current Appointments:

    Professor; Psychology; Judd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

    Professor; Institute for Policy Research; Research Centers and Institutes

    JohnD&CatherineT MacArthur Professor; Psychology; Judd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

    Research Centers and Institutes
    Institute for Policy Research
    Current Appointments:

    Professor; Psychology; Judd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

    Professor; Institute for Policy Research; Research Centers and Institutes

    JohnD&CatherineT MacArthur Professor; Psychology; Judd A. and Marjorie Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences

Research Interest Keywords

Social Psychology of Prejudice; Stereotyping & Discrimination; Intergroup Relations; Social Stigma; Diversity

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Coalition or derogation? How perceived discrimination influences intraminority intergroup relations

Maureen A. Craig; Jennifer A. Richeson

(Profiled Author: Jennifer Anne Richeson)

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2012;102(4):759-777.

Abstract

Five studies explored how perceived societal discrimination against one's own racial group influences racial minority group members' attitudes toward other racial minorities. Examining Black-Latino relations, Studies 1a and 1b showed that perceived discrimination toward oneself and one's own racial group may be positively associated with expressed closeness and common fate with another racial minority group, especially if individuals attribute past experiences of discrimination to their racial identity rather than to other social identities (Study 1b). In Studies 2-5, Asian American (Studies 2, 3, and 4) and Latino (Study 5) participants were primed with discrimination against their respective racial groups (or not) and completed measures of attitudes toward Black Americans. Participants primed with racial discrimination expressed greater positivity toward and perceived similarity with Blacks than did participants who were not primed. These results suggest, consistent with the common ingroup identity model (Gaertner & Dovidio, 2000), that salient discrimination against one's own racial group may trigger a common "disadvantaged racial minority" (ingroup) identity that engenders more positive attitudes toward and feelings of closeness toward other racial minorities. © 2011 American Psychological Association.


PMID: 22141393    

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