Jacqueline K Gollan Feinberg School of Medicine, Feinberg Clinical, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Jacqueline K Gollan

Research Interest Keywords

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Depression, Law & Psychology, Neuroscience, Psychotherapy, Women's Health, Women's Mental Health

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Obsessive-compulsive symptoms during the postpartum period: A prospective cohort

Emily S. Miller; Christine Chu; Jacqueline Gollan; Dana R. Gossett

(Profiled Authors: Jacqueline K Gollan; Dana R Gossett; Emily Stinnett Miller)

Journal of Reproductive Medicine. 2013;58(3-4):115-122.

Abstract

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of postpartum obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms and to ascertain risk factors for this condition. Study Design: This is a prospective cohort of postpartum women carried out from June to September 2009. A total of 461 women were recruited after delivery at a tertiary care institution. Demographic, psychiatric, and obstetric information were collected from each participant. Patients were contacted at 2 weeks and at 6 months postpartum and completed screening tests for depression, anxiety, and OCD. Results: Eleven percent of women screened positive for OCD symptoms at 2 weeks postpartum. At 6 months postpartum almost half of those women had persistent symptoms, and an additional 5.4% had developed new OCD symptoms. Concomitant positive screens for anxiety and depression were predictive factors for the development of OCD symptoms. Conclusion: Prior population-based studies estimate the prevalence of OCD to be approximately 2-3%. We found much higher rates among women in the postpartum period. The postpartum period is a high-risk time for the development of OCD symptoms. When such symptoms develop, they have a high likelihood of persisting for at least 6 months. © Journal of Reproductive Medicine®, Inc.


PMID: 23539879    

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