Tatyana Simuni Feinberg School of Medicine, Feinberg Clinical, Neurology

Tatyana Simuni

    Feinberg School of Medicine
    Feinberg Clinical
    Neurology
    Current Appointments:

    Professor; Neurology; Feinberg School of Medicine

    Arthur C. Nielsen, Jr. Research Professorship in Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders; Neurology; Feinberg School of Medicine

Research Interest Keywords

Atypical Parkinsonian Syndromes, Balance Disorders, Blepharospasm, Botox Injections, Clinical Trial Methodology, Drug Discovery, Dystonia, Essential Tremor, Gait Disorders, Lewy Body Dementia, Movement Control, Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease

Office phone

312/503-2970

Email

Scopus Publication Detail

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Diffusion tensor imaging of Parkinson's disease, atypical parkinsonism, and essential tremor

Janey Prodoehl; Hong Li; Peggy J. Planetta; Christopher G. Goetz; Kathleen M. Shannon; Ruth Tangonan; Cynthia L. Comella; Tanya Simuni; Xiaohong Joe Zhou; Sue Leurgans; et al.

(Profiled Authors: Tatyana Simuni; Daniel Montie Corcos)

Movement Disorders. 2013;28(13):1816-1822.

Abstract

Diffusion tensor imaging could be useful in characterizing movement disorders because it noninvasively examines multiple brain regions simultaneously. We report a multitarget imaging approach focused on the basal ganglia and cerebellum in Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and essential tremor and in healthy controls. Seventy-two subjects were studied with a diffusion tensor imaging protocol at 3 Tesla. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to directly compare groups. Sensitivity and specificity values were quantified for control versus movement disorder (92% sensitivity, 88% specificity), control versus parkinsonism (93% sensitivity, 91% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus atypical parkinsonism (90% sensitivity, 100% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus multiple system atrophy (94% sensitivity, 100% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus progressive supranuclear palsy (87% sensitivity, 100% specificity), multiple system atrophy versus progressive supranuclear palsy (90% sensitivity, 100% specificity), and Parkinson's disease versus essential tremor (92% sensitivity, 87% specificity). The brain targets varied for each comparison, but the substantia nigra, putamen, caudate, and middle cerebellar peduncle were the most frequently selected brain regions across classifications. These results indicate that using diffusion tensor imaging of the basal ganglia and cerebellum accurately classifies subjects diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, atypical parkinsonism, and essential tremor and clearly distinguishes them from control subjects. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.


PMID: 23674400     PMCID: PMC3748146    

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