Circumstances and toxicology of violence-related deaths among young people who have had contact with the youth justice system: a data linkage study

  • Melissa Willoughby (Creator)
  • Jesse T. Young (Creator)
  • Katie Hail-Jares (Creator)
  • Matthew J. Spittal (Creator)
  • Rohan Borschmann (Creator)
  • George C. Patton (Creator)
  • Susan M. Sawyer (Creator)
  • Emilia Janca (Creator)
  • Linda A Teplin (Creator)
  • Ed Heffernan (Creator)
  • Stuart A. Kinner (Creator)

Dataset

Description

Abstract Background Young people who have had contact with the youth justice system have an increased risk of dying from violence. Examining the context of violence-related deaths is essential in informing prevention strategies. We examined the circumstances and toxicology of violence-related deaths among young people who have had contact with the youth justice system in Queensland, Australia. Methods This data linkage study linked youth justice records from Queensland, Australia (30 June 1993-1 July 2014) on 48,670 young people to national death and coroner records (1 July 2000-1 January 2017). Circumstances and toxicology of deaths were coded from coroner’s records. We calculated the incidence of violence-related deaths that were reported to a coroner. Fisher’s exact tests were used to examine crude differences in the circumstances and toxicology of violence-related death, according to sex and Indigenous status. Results There were 982 deaths reported to a coroner in the cohort. Of which, 36 (4%) were from violence-related causes (incidence: 6 per 100,000 person-years, 95% confidence interval: 4-8). People who died from violence were most frequently male (n = 28/36; 78%), and almost half were Indigenous (n = 16/36; 44%). The majority of violence-related deaths involved a weapon (n = 24/36; 67%), most commonly a knife (n = 17/36; 47%). Compared to men where the violent incident was most frequently preceded by an altercation (n = 12/28; 43%), for women it was frequently preceded by a relationship breakdown or argument (n
Date made available2021
Publisherfigshare

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