• 344 Citations
20012022
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Personal profile

Research Interests

It is estimated that 10-25% of human embryos are chromosomally abnormal, resulting in a high incidence of miscarriages and birth defects. Most of these abnormalities are the result of chromosome segregation defects in the female reproductive cells (oocytes), yet surprisingly little is known about the biological mechanisms that underlie the vulnerability of oocytes to segregation errors.  The Wignall lab is focused on investigating this important problem, by combining high-resolution microscopy with genetic, genomic, and biochemical approaches in the nematode C. elegans.  Current work in the lab is focused on two major areas:  1) investigating the molecular mechanisms of spindle assembly in oocytes, and 2) exploring mechanisms of chromosome congression and segregation.

Education/Academic qualification

Molecular and Cell Biology, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

… → 2003

Biological Sciences, MPhil, University of Cambridge

… → 1997

Biology, BS, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

… → 1996

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics where Sadie Wignall is active. These topic labels come from the works of this person. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • 6 Similar Profiles
Microtubules Medicine & Life Sciences
Oocytes Medicine & Life Sciences
Meiosis Medicine & Life Sciences
Caenorhabditis elegans Medicine & Life Sciences
Chromosome Segregation Medicine & Life Sciences
Anaphase Medicine & Life Sciences
Chromosomes Medicine & Life Sciences
Kinetochores Medicine & Life Sciences

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Grants 2011 2022

Chromosome Segregation
Meiosis
Oocytes
Chromosomes
Cell Division
Kinesin
Spindle Apparatus
Meiosis
Chromosome Segregation
Aneuploidy
Chromosome Segregation
Oocytes
Chromosomes
Kinetochores
Cell Division

Research Output 2001 2019

  • 344 Citations
  • 14 Article
  • 2 Review article

Chromokinesin Kif4 promotes proper anaphase in mouse oocyte meiosis

Heath, C. M. & Wignall, S., Jul 1 2019, In : Molecular biology of the cell. 30, 14, p. 1691-1704 14 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Open Access
Anaphase
Meiosis
Oocytes
Chromosome Segregation
Aurora Kinase C

Spindle assembly and chromosome dynamics during oocyte meiosis

Mullen, T. J., Davis-Roca, A. C. & Wignall, S., Oct 1 2019, In : Current Opinion in Cell Biology. 60, p. 53-59 7 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Meiosis
Cell Division
Oocytes
Chromosomes
Haploidy
2 Citations (Scopus)

Dynamic SUMO remodeling drives a series of critical events during the meiotic divisions in Caenorhabditis elegans

Davis-Roca, A. C., Divekar, N. S., Ng, R. K. & Wignall, S., Sep 1 2018, In : PLoS genetics. 14, 9, e1007626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ring complex
Anaphase
anaphase
Caenorhabditis elegans
Prometaphase
5 Citations (Scopus)

Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes detect meiotic errors in the absence of canonical end-on kinetochore attachments

Davis-Roca, A. C., Muscat, C. C. & Wignall, S., May 1 2017, In : Journal of Cell Biology. 216, 5, p. 1243-1253 11 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kinetochores
Caenorhabditis elegans
Oocytes
Anaphase
Microtubules
6 Citations (Scopus)

Interplay between microtubule bundling and sorting factors ensures acentriolar spindle stability during C. elegans oocyte meiosis

Mullen, T. J. & Wignall, S., Sep 1 2017, In : PLoS Genetics. 13, 9, e1006986.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meiosis
Microtubules
meiosis
sorting
microtubules