Center for Native American and Indigenous Research Phase II

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

The Center for Native American and Indigenous Research at Northwestern University aims to strengthen research and teaching relating to Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS) at Northwestern and, more broadly, in the United States and the world.

Our long-term research agenda for NAIS is as follows:

CNAIR will serve as a hub for connecting NAIS research and teaching across Northwestern, while also connecting Northwestern faculty and student researchers with Native nations, Native-serving organizations, and our Chicago-area and national partners. CNAIR will establish research infrastructure in order to provide mentoring and training in NAIS methodologies, which exceed the forms of knowledge production in traditional disciplines.
CNAIR will generate cutting-edge research with and about Indigenous nations and communities. In the next five years, our focus will be on supporting research on topics of environmental justice, health and social welfare, nationhood, urban Indigenous communities, and global indigeneity.


We propose two interconnected initiatives in this proposal to work toward this agenda:

To serve as a hub for NAIS research and methodologies, we will expand our collaborations with external partners, including Native-serving organizations throughout Chicagoland, tribal nations, and an emerging network of NAIS research centers.
With the first Mellon grant, we built NAIS research, teaching, and programmatic structures that can now effectively support students’ and faculty members’ NAIS research and Native students and faculty. We are well positioned in this current proposal to undertake initiatives to recruit and retain Native students, especially Native undergraduate students.
StatusActive
Effective start/end date6/23/219/30/26

Funding

  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (1905-06863)

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