The Development of a Hyperpectral Microscope for Immunofluorescence Imaging of Painting Cross-sections

Project: Research project

Description

Hawara portrait mummy #4 is a complete portrait-mummy of a girl in the collection of the Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary on Northwestern’s campus. She was excavated in December 1910 by Sir Flinders Petrie, a pioneering Egyptologist, at a site called Hawara located in the Fayum depression. Petrie’s field notes show that he discovered this mummy in a tomb alongside four others, two of them known to be in the collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (11.139) and the National Museums of Scotland (A.1911.210). This burial group presents a unique opportunity to unpack the possible family relationships by undertaking DNA testing. This information could vastly improve our understanding of burial practices and the history of art for these types of portrait mummies. Here we propose to develop the capabilities of undertaking ancient DNA sequencing at Northwestern University using the Hawara portrait mummy #4, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and National Museum of Scotland mummies as case studies that will show the potential of using DNA for the characterization of their family connections, whether these individuals died of disease, as well as broader questions concerning ancestry, movement of ancient people, and inter-marriage in this prototypical multicultural community within the ancient Fayum.
StatusActive
Effective start/end date9/1/198/31/20

Funding

  • Richard Lounsbery Foundation (Check No. 23463)

Fingerprint

Imaging
Cross Section
Mummies
Microscope
Metropolitan Museum of Art
National Museums of Scotland
Family Relationships
Art History
Ancient DNA
Burial
Seminary
DNA Sequencing
Intermarriage
Campus
Tombs
Testing
Egyptologists
Ancestry
Burial Practices
Field Notes