2D/3D cryo X-ray fluorescence imaging at the bionanoprobe at the advanced photon source

S. Chen*, T. Paunesku, Y. Yuan, J. Deng, Q. Jin, Y. P. Hong, D. J. Vine, B. Lai, C. Flachenecker, B. Hornberger, K. Brister, C. Jacobsen, G. E. Woloschak, S. Vogt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Trace elements, particularly metals, play very important roles in biological systems. Synchrotron-based hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy offers the most suitable capabilities to quantitatively study trace metals in thick biological samples, such as whole cells and tissues. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated X-ray fluorescence imaging of frozen-hydrated whole cells using the recent developed Bionanoprobe (BNP). The BNP provides spatial resolution down to 30 nm and cryogenic capabilities. Frozen-hydrated biological cells have been directly examined on a sub-cellular level at liquid nitrogen temperatures with minimal sample preparation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationXRM 2014
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 12th International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy
EditorsMartin D. de Jonge, David J. Paterson, Christopher G. Ryan
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9780735413436
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 28 2016
Event12th International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy, XRM 2014 - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: Oct 26 2014Oct 31 2014

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume1696
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

Other12th International Conference on X-Ray Microscopy, XRM 2014
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period10/26/1410/31/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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