A cellular perspective on conformational disease: the role of genetic background and proteostasis networks

Tali Gidalevitz*, Elise A. Kikis, Richard I. Morimoto

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

The inherently error-prone nature of protein biosynthesis and turnover leads to a constant flux of destabilized proteins. Genetic mutations in conformational disease-associated proteins, as well as exposure to acute and chronic proteotoxic stresses, further increase the load of misfolded protein on the proteostasis network. During aging, this leads to enhanced instability of the proteome, failure to buffer destabilizing genetic mutations or polymorphisms, and cellular decline. The combination of cell-type-specific differences in the buffering capacity of the proteostasis network and destabilizing polymorphisms in the genetic background may account for some of the cell-type specificity observed in disease, even when the predominant disease-associated protein is widely expressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-32
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Opinion in Structural Biology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Molecular Biology

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