A classification tree model for decision-making in clinical practice: An application based on the data of the german multicenter study on eating disorders, Project TR-EAT

Wolfgang Hannöver, Matthias Richard, Nathan B. Hansen, Zoran Martinovich, Hans Kordy*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To bridge the gap between science and practice in mental health care, scientific methods need to be developed that have direct applications in clinical practice. Studies that report "average" effects document the efficacy of psychotherapy but have limited implications for decision making in clinical practice. Although it is very unlikely that statistical models will ever perfectly predict treatment outcomes, models that identify and describe changes in a patient's risk of treatment failure may be developed to support decisions during ongoing treatment. In the current study, the classification and regression tree (CART) method was applied to data from the German multicenter study on the relationship between treatment duration/intensity and outcome in inpatient treatment of eating disorders (Project TR-EAT). Within a sample of patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (n = 630), data on admission, treatment strategy, and treatment response were used to develop a CART decision tree. This has potential for treatment decision support because the tree structure identifies changes in risk status associated with available treatment options and is sensitive to a patient's unique presenting characteristics and observed treatment response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-461
Number of pages17
JournalPsychotherapy Research
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

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Multicenter Studies
Therapeutics
Bulimia Nervosa
Decision Trees
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Clinical Decision-Making
Statistical Models
Treatment Failure
Psychotherapy
Inpatients
Mental Health
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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A classification tree model for decision-making in clinical practice : An application based on the data of the german multicenter study on eating disorders, Project TR-EAT. / Hannöver, Wolfgang; Richard, Matthias; Hansen, Nathan B.; Martinovich, Zoran; Kordy, Hans.

In: Psychotherapy Research, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.12.2002, p. 445-461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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