A clinical and immunologic study of workers with trimellitic-anhydride- induced immunologic lung disease after transfer to low exposure jobs

L. C. Grammer*, M. A. Shaughnessy, J. Henderson, C. R. Zeiss, D. E. Kavich, M. J. Collins, K. M. Pecis, B. D. Kenamore

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of the study was to determine the clinical and immunologic status of trimellitic anhydride (TMA) workers who have had immunologic lung diseases and who have been moved to lower exposure jobs. Twenty-nine consecutive workers with TMA-induced immunologic lung diseases who had been moved to low exposure jobs for more than 1 yr were studied retrospectively. Pulmonary symptoms were obtained by physician-administered questionnaire. Immunologic studies were performed using radioimmunoassay. Spirometry and chest film were obtained. Workers with late asthma (LA) (n = 3), late respiratory systemic syndrome (LRSS) (n = 8), or both LRSS and asthma rhinitis (A/R) (n = 6) had improved symptoms, improved pulmonary functions, and lower total antibody against TM-HSA. Five of the 12 workers with A/R had improved symptoms, improved pulmonary functions, and lower IgE against TM- HSA, whereas seven continued to have moderate to severe symptoms, abnormal pulmonary functions, and elevated IgE against TM-HSA. There were no chest film findings in any group that were definitely attributed to TMA. Although TMA workers with LA or LRSS improve when moved to lower exposure jobs, only half of workers with A/R improve; elevated IgE against TM-HSA appears to be a marker for the subpopulation of workers with A/R that does not improve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-57
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Review of Respiratory Disease
Volume148
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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