A Comparison of Theory-Based and Experimentally Determined Myocardial Signal Intensity Correction Methods in First-Pass Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Jacob U. Fluckiger, Brandon C. Benefield, Lara Bakhos, Kathleen R. Harris, Daniel C. Lee*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. To evaluate the impact of correcting myocardial signal saturation on the accuracy of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurements. Materials and Methods. We performed 15 dual bolus first-pass perfusion studies in 7 dogs during global coronary vasodilation and variable degrees of coronary artery stenosis. We compared microsphere MBF to MBF calculated from uncorrected and corrected MRI signal. Four correction methods were tested, two theoretical methods (Th1 and Th2) and two empirical methods (Em1 and Em2). Results. The correlations with microsphere MBF (n = 90 segments) were: uncorrected (y = 0.47 x + 1.1, r = 0.70), Th1 (y = 0.53 x + 1.0, r = 0.71), Th2 (y = 0.62 x + 0.86, r = 0.73), Em1 (y = 0.82 x + 0.86, r = 0.77), and Em2 (y = 0.72 x + 0.84, r = 0.75). All corrected methods were not significantly different from microspheres, while uncorrected MBF values were significantly lower. For the top 50% of microsphere MBF values, flows were significantly underestimated by uncorrected SI (31%), Th1 (25%), and Th2 (19%), while Em1 (1%), and Em2 (9%) were similar to microsphere MBF. Conclusions. Myocardial signal saturation should be corrected prior to flow modeling to avoid underestimation of MBF by MR perfusion imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number843741
JournalComputational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Applied Mathematics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A Comparison of Theory-Based and Experimentally Determined Myocardial Signal Intensity Correction Methods in First-Pass Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this