A Comprehensive Strategy for Improving Nasal Outcomes after Large Maxillomandibular Advancement for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Mohamed Abdelwahab, Sasikarn Poomkonsarn, Xiatong Ren, Michael Awad, Robson Capasso, Robert Riley, Sam Most, Stanley Yung Chuan Liu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Rate of corrective nasal surgery after maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been reported to be 18.7% for functional and aesthetic indications. Objective: Describe a comprehensive strategy to optimize nasal outcomes with MMA for OSA. Methods: A retrospective review of patients undergoing MMA for OSA in a tertiary referral center was performed, with a comprehensive perioperative intervention to optimize nasal outcomes from January 2014 to February 2018. Outcomes included the Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI), oxygen saturation (SpO2) nadir, corrective nasal surgery needed after MMA, and Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scores. Results: AHI after MMA showed significant reduction (-34.65, p < 0.001), SpO2 nadir increased (+6.08, p < 0.001), and NOSE scores decreased (-5.96, p < 0.001). Corrective nasal surgery needed after MMA was reported in 6.5% (8 of 122) subjects at a mean of 8.5 months, ranging from 1 to 24.7 months. Six subjects underwent either septoplasty and/or valve stenosis repair, and two subjects underwent functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty. Conclusion: A perioperative strategy was applied since 2014 that showed effectiveness in reducing post-MMA corrective nasal surgery to 6.5%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-442
Number of pages6
JournalFacial Plastic Surgery and Aesthetic Medicine
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

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