A conventional theory of mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity

Y. Huang*, S. Qu, K. C. Hwang, M. Li, H. Gao

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

362 Scopus citations

Abstract

There exist two frameworks of strain gradient plasticity theories to model size effects observed at the micron and sub-micron scales in experiments. The first framework involves the higher-order stress and therefore requires extra boundary conditions, such as the theory of mechanism-based strain gradient (MSG) plasticity [J Mech Phys Solids 47 (1999) 1239; J Mech Phys Solids 48 (2000) 99; J Mater Res 15 (2000) 1786] established from the Taylor dislocation model. The other framework does not involve the higher-order stress, and the strain gradient effect come into play via the incremental plastic moduli. A conventional theory of mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity is established in this paper. It is also based on the Taylor dislocation model, but it does not involve the higher-order stress and therefore falls into the second strain gradient plasticity framework that preserves the structure of conventional plasticity theories. The plastic strain gradient appears only in the constitutive model, and the equilibrium equations and boundary conditions are the same as the conventional continuum theories. It is shown that the difference between this theory and the higher-order MSG plasticity theory based on the same dislocation model is only significant within a thin boundary layer of the solid.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)753-782
Number of pages30
JournalInternational journal of plasticity
Volume20
Issue number4-5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

Keywords

  • Conventional theory
  • Dislocation model
  • Strain gradient plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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