A Cross-sectional Study of Perceived Stress and Racial Discrimination Among a National Sample of Young Men Who Have Sex With Men

Evette Cordoba*, Robert Garofalo, Lisa M. Kuhns, Cynthia R. Pearson, D. Scott Batey, Josh Bruce, Asa Radix, Uri Belkind, Marco A. Hidalgo, Sabina Hirshfield, Rebecca Schnall

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Research regarding the impact of racism on stress among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) is sparse. Secondary data were assessed from a 2018-2020 national mHealth prevention trial for YMSM aged 13-18 years (N = 542). Linear regression models examined associations between perceived stress and interpersonal and vicarious racism, adjusting for covariates. Stratified models by race/ethnicity were included. A subanalysis (n = 288) examined associations between nine interpersonal racial discriminatory events and perceived stress. Over 50% of participants experienced racial discrimination. In the multivariable models, exposure to interpersonal (β = 1.43, p-value:.038) and vicarious (β = 1.77, p-value:.008) racism was associated with perceived stress because there were four interpersonal racial discriminatory events. Stratified analysis by race/ethnicity found significant associations between interpersonal and vicarious racism and perceived stress among some racial/ethnic groups. Racial discrimination was common among YMSM, making them susceptible to the possible effects of vicarious and interpersonal racism on stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-237
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2023

Keywords

  • YMSM
  • cross-sectional study
  • interpersonal racism
  • perceived stress
  • racial discrimination
  • racism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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