A cyclin-binding motif in human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E1^E4 is necessary for association with CDK-cyclin complexes and G2/M cell cycle arrest of keratinocytes, but is not required for differentiation-dependent viral genome amplification or L1 capsid protein expression

Gillian L. Knight, Alice G. Pugh, Emma Yates, Ian Bell, Regina Wilson, Cary A. Moody, Laimonis A. Laimins, Sally Roberts*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The G2/M arrest function of human papillomavirus (HPV) E4 proteins is hypothesized to be necessary for viral genome amplification. Full-length HPV18 E1^E4 protein is essential for efficient viral genome amplification. Here we identify key determinants within a CDK-bipartite consensus recognition motif in HPV18 E1^E4 that are critical for association with active CDK-cyclin complexes and in vitro phosphorylation at the predicted CDK phosphorylation site (threonine 23). The optimal cyclin-binding sequence (43RRLL46) within this E4 motif is required for G2/M arrest of primary keratinocytes and correlates with cytoplasmic retention of cyclin B1, but not cyclin A. Disruption of this motif in the E4 ORF of HPV18 genomes, and the subsequent generation of stable cell lines in primary keratinocytes revealed that this motif was not essential for viral genome amplification or L1 capsid protein induction. We conclude that the HPV18 E4 G2/M arrest function does not play a role in early vegetative events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-210
Number of pages15
JournalVirology
Volume412
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 30 2011

Keywords

  • CDK
  • Cyclin B1
  • E1^E4
  • E4
  • G2 arrest
  • G2/M arrest
  • H genome amplification
  • HPV
  • HPV life cycle
  • Human papillomavirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

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