A Daily Diary Study of Executive Functions, Coping, and Mood Among Low-Income Latino Adolescents

Jaclyn Lennon Papadakis*, Anne K. Fuller, Stephanie K. Brewer, Rebecca L. Silton, Catherine De Carlo Santiago

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study used daily diary methodology to examine the association between executive functions and daily mood, as mediated by daily coping, among low-income Latino adolescents. Fifty-eight middle school students (53% male, (Formula presented.) = 13.31 years, 95% Latino) completed baseline measures assessing demographic characteristics and executive functions (working memory, inhibition, shifting). They subsequently completed seven consecutive daily diaries assessing daily coping (engagement, disengagement) and mood (positive, negative). Results revealed two significant mediation models: daily disengagement coping partially mediated the association between working memory and daily negative mood; daily disengagement coping partially mediated the association between inhibition and daily negative mood. Mediation models including shifting and engagement coping were not significant. Findings suggest that adolescents with poorer working memory and poorer inhibition may rely on maladaptive coping strategies, which can impact mood. Clinical implications and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)824-848
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Early Adolescence
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Latino
  • affect
  • cognitive development
  • coping
  • critical thinking
  • emotions
  • low income
  • mood Hispanic
  • reasoning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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