A DNA-based method for rationally assembling nanoparticles into macroscopic materials

Chad A Mirkin*, Robert L. Letsinger, Robert C. Mucic, James J. Storhoff

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5417 Scopus citations

Abstract

Colloidal particles of metals and semiconductors have potentially useful optical, optoelectronic and material properties that derive from their small (nanoscopic) size. These properties might lead to applications including chemical sensors, spectroscopic enhancers, quantum dot and nanostructure fabrication, and microimaging methods. A great deal of control can now be exercised over the chemical composition, size and polydispersity of colloidal particles, and many methods have been developed for assembling them into useful aggregates and materials. Here we describe a method for assembling colloidal gold nanoparticles rationally and reversibly into macroscopic aggregates. The method involves attaching to the surfaces of two batches of 13-nm gold particles non-complementary DNA oligonucleotides capped with thiol groups, which bind to gold. When we add to the solution an oligonucleotide duplex with 'sticky ends' that are complementary to the two grafted sequences, the nanoparticles self-assemble into aggregates. This assembly process can be reversed by thermal denaturation. This strategy should now make it possible to tailor the optical, electronic and structural properties of the colloidal aggregates by using the specificity of DNA interactions to direct the interactions between particles of different size and composition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)607-609
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume382
Issue number6592
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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