A Double-Edged Sword: Dual-Identity Centrality and the Health of Asian American Sexual Minority Individuals

Hae Dong Kim*, Samuel H. Allen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Asian American sexual minority individuals (AASMI) face the challenge of navigating two identities as both a sexual minority and a racial minority. However, the research base examining AASMI dual-identities remains underdeveloped. In the current study, we investigated the link between AASMI dual-identity centrality and their health and wellbeing using a subsample of 303 AASMI drawn from the Social Justice Sexuality Project dataset (n = 4,953). We conducted structural equation modeling (SEM) to test our hypothesized model and used bootstrap analysis to test the indirect effects therein. Findings indicated strong support for our model, which theorized that dual-identity centrality among AASMI can act as a “double-edged sword” on their health, whereby the process worsens their health through increased discomfort in their racial/ethnic community while simultaneously improving it through increased outness. Implications for future research and new avenues of intervention efforts at improving AASMI health are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Homosexuality
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • health disparities
  • mental health
  • racial identity
  • racial/ethnic community
  • Sexual orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Double-Edged Sword: Dual-Identity Centrality and the Health of Asian American Sexual Minority Individuals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this