A dual process approach to understanding prejudice toward Americans in Lebanon: An extension to intergroup threat perceptions and emotions

Shana Levin*, Felicia Pratto, Miriam Matthews, Jim Sidanius, Nour Kteily

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a stratified random sampling procedure, we interviewed 200 residents of Beirut, Lebanon and surrounding areas in order to test predictions of a dual process model of prejudice. We examined the role of social dominance orientation (SDO) and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) in predicting prejudice toward Americans, mediating the relationships between personality dimensions and prejudice, and predicting intergroup emotions indirectly through intergroup threat perceptions. Three main findings emerged. First, whereas RWA was a positive predictor of prejudice toward Americans, SDO was a negative predictor. Second, RWA mediated a positive relationship between a social conforming personality and prejudice toward Americans; SDO mediated a negative relationship between a tough-minded personality and prejudice. Third, value threat perceptions mediated a positive relationship between RWA and feelings of disgust toward Americans; economic threat perceptions mediated a negative relationship between SDO and anger toward Americans. Applications and extensions of the dual process model in non-Western populations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-158
Number of pages20
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • dual process models
  • intergroup processes
  • prejudice/stereotyping
  • social dominance orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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