A Field Experiment Demonstrates Near Peer Mentorship as an Effective Support for Student Persistence

Mesmin Destin*, Claudia Castillo, Lynn Meissner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The attitudes and behaviors of peers can predict an individual’s own behaviors, particularly during adolescence. However experimental studies have not demonstrated how slightly older near peers can exert a positive influence on important aspects of school motivation that predict student academic achievement over time. We designed and evaluated the effects of a randomized controlled field experiment where 8th-grade participants were randomly assigned to either a mentoring treatment group or a tutoring control group, both led by randomly selected and trained high school students. As predicted, participants in the treatment group increased in their tendency to value and persist through academic difficulty compared to those in the control group, with important potential implications for academic achievement and peer mentoring programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-278
Number of pages10
JournalBasic and Applied Social Psychology
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Field Experiment Demonstrates Near Peer Mentorship as an Effective Support for Student Persistence'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this