A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of auditory vigilance with low and high information processing demands

Larry J. Seidman*, Jill M. Goldstein, Kathy O'Craven, Robert Savoy, Hans C. Breiter, Julie M. Goodman, Peter W R Woodruff, Ming T. Tsuang, Bruce R. Rosen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

87 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study identified the brain activations associated with auditory vigilance tasks, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We created auditory continuous performance tests (CPTs) in which a demanding task (working memory task) was made more difficult than a simple vigilance task by increasing working memory and interference filtering demands. Two cohorts of normal male controls performed significantly worse on the working memory CPT than on the vigilance task. Compared to the vigilance task, performance of the working memory task produced significant signal change in lateral and medial prefrontal cortex, precentral cortex, temporal lobe, including insula and hippocampus, parietal-occipital cortex, cingulate, thalamus, and superior colliculus. Performance and degree of activation was associated with an estimate of IQ. Further research should clarify the contributions of working memory and interference filtering to the activated network.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-518
Number of pages14
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of auditory vigilance with low and high information processing demands'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this