A goal-striving life event and the onset of hypomanic and depressive episodes and symptoms: Perspective from the behavioral approach system (BAS) dysregulation theory

Robin Nusslock*, Lyn Y. Abramson, Eddie Harmon-Jones, Lauren B. Alloy, Michael E. Hogan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

105 Scopus citations

Abstract

On the basis of the behavioral approach system (BAS) dysregulation theory of bipolar disorder, this study examined the relation between occurrence of a BAS activation-relevant life event - goal striving - and onset of hypomanic and depressive episodes and symptoms. In particular, the authors examined the relation between preparing for and completing final exams (a goal-striving event) and onset of bipolar spectrum episodes and symptoms in college students with bipolar II disorder or cyclothymia (i.e., "soft" bipolar spectrum conditions). One hundred fifty-nine individuals with either a bipolar spectrum disorder (n=68) or no major affective psychopathology (controls; n=91) were further classified on the basis of whether they were college students (i.e., completed final exams). Consistent with the BAS dysregulation theory, preparing for and completing final exams was associated with an increase in hypomanic but not depressive episodes and symptoms in individuals with a soft bipolar spectrum diagnosis. Furthermore, self-reported BAS sensitivity moderated the presence of certain hypomanic symptoms during final exams.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-115
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of abnormal psychology
Volume116
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Keywords

  • BAS
  • Behavioral approach system dysregulation
  • Bipolar spectrum disorders
  • Depressive episodes
  • Final exams
  • Goal striving
  • Hypomania
  • Life events
  • Symptom onset

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A goal-striving life event and the onset of hypomanic and depressive episodes and symptoms: Perspective from the behavioral approach system (BAS) dysregulation theory'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this