A history of health-related quality of life outcomes in psychiatry

Dennis A. Revicki, Leah Kleinman, David Cella*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a multidimensional concept that includes subjective reports of symptoms, side effects, functioning in multiple life domains, and general perceptions of life satisfaction and quality. Rather than estimating it from external observations, interview, or clinical assessment, it is best measured by direct query. Due to a perception that respondents may not be reliable or credible, there has been some reluctance to use self-report outcomes in psychiatry. More recently, and increasingly, HRQoL assessment through direct patient query has become common when evaluating a range of psychiatric, psychological, and social therapies. With few exceptions, psychiatric patients are credible and reliable reporters of this information. This article summarizes studies that highlight the development, validation, and application of HRQoL measures in psychiatry. Thoughtful application of these tools in psychiatric research can provide a much-needed patient perspective in the future of comparative effectiveness research, patient-centered outcomes research, and clinical care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-135
Number of pages9
JournalDialogues in Clinical Neuroscience
Volume16
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Health-related quality of life
  • Patient-reported outcome
  • Psychiatric outcome
  • Psychiatric symptom
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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