A longitudinal examination of risk and protective factors for cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth

Michael E. Newcomb*, Adrienne J. Heinz, Michelle Birkett, Brian Mustanski

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate change across development in two smoking outcomes (smoking status and rate), describe demographic differences in smoking, and longitudinally examine the effects of psychosocial variables on smoking (psychological distress, victimization, and social support) in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Methods: Participants were 248 ethnically diverse LGBT youth (ages 16-20 years at baseline) from a longitudinal cohort study with six waves over 3.5 years. Baseline questionnaires included demographic variables and a measure of impulsivity, and longitudinal questionnaires included measures of cigarette smoking (status and average number of cigarettes smoked daily), LGBT-based victimization, psychological distress, and perceived social support. Analyses were conducted with hierarchical linear modeling. Results: Males had higher odds of smoking and smoking rate than females, but females' smoking rate increased more rapidly over time. Psychological distress was associated with higher odds of smoking and smoking rate at the same wave, and it predicted smoking rate at the subsequent wave. LGBT victimization was associated with higher odds of smoking at the same wave and predicted smoking rate at the subsequent wave. Finally, significant other support predicted higher odds of smoking and smoking rate at the subsequent wave, but family support was negatively correlated with smoking rate at the same wave. Conclusions: There are several viable avenues for the development of smoking prevention interventions for LGBT youth. To optimize the efficacy of prevention strategies, we must consider experiences with victimization, the impact of psychological distress, and optimizing support from families and romantic partners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-564
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Transgender Persons
Smoking
Crime Victims
Psychology
Protective Factors
Sexual Minorities
Social Support
Demography

Keywords

  • Family support
  • LGBT youth
  • Psychological distress
  • Romantic support
  • Smoking
  • Victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{fe2884cb262d45768767180db1a7f283,
title = "A longitudinal examination of risk and protective factors for cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth",
abstract = "Purpose: To investigate change across development in two smoking outcomes (smoking status and rate), describe demographic differences in smoking, and longitudinally examine the effects of psychosocial variables on smoking (psychological distress, victimization, and social support) in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Methods: Participants were 248 ethnically diverse LGBT youth (ages 16-20 years at baseline) from a longitudinal cohort study with six waves over 3.5 years. Baseline questionnaires included demographic variables and a measure of impulsivity, and longitudinal questionnaires included measures of cigarette smoking (status and average number of cigarettes smoked daily), LGBT-based victimization, psychological distress, and perceived social support. Analyses were conducted with hierarchical linear modeling. Results: Males had higher odds of smoking and smoking rate than females, but females' smoking rate increased more rapidly over time. Psychological distress was associated with higher odds of smoking and smoking rate at the same wave, and it predicted smoking rate at the subsequent wave. LGBT victimization was associated with higher odds of smoking at the same wave and predicted smoking rate at the subsequent wave. Finally, significant other support predicted higher odds of smoking and smoking rate at the subsequent wave, but family support was negatively correlated with smoking rate at the same wave. Conclusions: There are several viable avenues for the development of smoking prevention interventions for LGBT youth. To optimize the efficacy of prevention strategies, we must consider experiences with victimization, the impact of psychological distress, and optimizing support from families and romantic partners.",
keywords = "Family support, LGBT youth, Psychological distress, Romantic support, Smoking, Victimization",
author = "Newcomb, {Michael E.} and Heinz, {Adrienne J.} and Michelle Birkett and Brian Mustanski",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.10.208",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "558--564",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A longitudinal examination of risk and protective factors for cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth

AU - Newcomb, Michael E.

AU - Heinz, Adrienne J.

AU - Birkett, Michelle

AU - Mustanski, Brian

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Purpose: To investigate change across development in two smoking outcomes (smoking status and rate), describe demographic differences in smoking, and longitudinally examine the effects of psychosocial variables on smoking (psychological distress, victimization, and social support) in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Methods: Participants were 248 ethnically diverse LGBT youth (ages 16-20 years at baseline) from a longitudinal cohort study with six waves over 3.5 years. Baseline questionnaires included demographic variables and a measure of impulsivity, and longitudinal questionnaires included measures of cigarette smoking (status and average number of cigarettes smoked daily), LGBT-based victimization, psychological distress, and perceived social support. Analyses were conducted with hierarchical linear modeling. Results: Males had higher odds of smoking and smoking rate than females, but females' smoking rate increased more rapidly over time. Psychological distress was associated with higher odds of smoking and smoking rate at the same wave, and it predicted smoking rate at the subsequent wave. LGBT victimization was associated with higher odds of smoking at the same wave and predicted smoking rate at the subsequent wave. Finally, significant other support predicted higher odds of smoking and smoking rate at the subsequent wave, but family support was negatively correlated with smoking rate at the same wave. Conclusions: There are several viable avenues for the development of smoking prevention interventions for LGBT youth. To optimize the efficacy of prevention strategies, we must consider experiences with victimization, the impact of psychological distress, and optimizing support from families and romantic partners.

AB - Purpose: To investigate change across development in two smoking outcomes (smoking status and rate), describe demographic differences in smoking, and longitudinally examine the effects of psychosocial variables on smoking (psychological distress, victimization, and social support) in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Methods: Participants were 248 ethnically diverse LGBT youth (ages 16-20 years at baseline) from a longitudinal cohort study with six waves over 3.5 years. Baseline questionnaires included demographic variables and a measure of impulsivity, and longitudinal questionnaires included measures of cigarette smoking (status and average number of cigarettes smoked daily), LGBT-based victimization, psychological distress, and perceived social support. Analyses were conducted with hierarchical linear modeling. Results: Males had higher odds of smoking and smoking rate than females, but females' smoking rate increased more rapidly over time. Psychological distress was associated with higher odds of smoking and smoking rate at the same wave, and it predicted smoking rate at the subsequent wave. LGBT victimization was associated with higher odds of smoking at the same wave and predicted smoking rate at the subsequent wave. Finally, significant other support predicted higher odds of smoking and smoking rate at the subsequent wave, but family support was negatively correlated with smoking rate at the same wave. Conclusions: There are several viable avenues for the development of smoking prevention interventions for LGBT youth. To optimize the efficacy of prevention strategies, we must consider experiences with victimization, the impact of psychological distress, and optimizing support from families and romantic partners.

KW - Family support

KW - LGBT youth

KW - Psychological distress

KW - Romantic support

KW - Smoking

KW - Victimization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84898782118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84898782118&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.10.208

DO - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.10.208

M3 - Article

C2 - 24388111

AN - SCOPUS:84898782118

VL - 54

SP - 558

EP - 564

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 5

ER -