A Longitudinal Study of Differences in Perceived Parenting Practices Between Sexual Minority and Heterosexual Girls

Xanthia Tucker, Johnny Berona, Alison E. Hipwell, Kate Keenan*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Parental warmth and control are consistent and persistent correlates of adolescent health and may be particularly important for sexual minority girls, who experience higher rates of adverse health outcomes than their heterosexual peers. Differences in perceptions of parental trust, positivity, supervision, and discipline from ages 11–17 years were examined between sexual minority and heterosexual girls using data from the Pittsburgh Girls Study, a longitudinal, community-based study. Results indicated that sexual minority girls reported lower levels of parental trust and positivity compared to heterosexual girls beginning in mid-adolescence; differences in supervision were present at age 11 years and persisted over time. Further investigation of this perceived difference is warranted given the importance of familial support for health promotion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • longitudinal
  • parenting
  • Pittsburgh Girls Study
  • sexual minority

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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