A Longitudinal Study of IPV Victimization Among Sexual Minority Youth

Sarah W. Whitton, Michael Newcomb, Adam M. Messinger, Gayle Byck, Brian Mustanski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although intimate partner violence (IPV) is highly prevalent among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth, little is known regarding its developmental patterns, risk factors, or health-related consequences. We examined IPV victimization in an ethnically diverse community-based convenience sample of 248 LGBT youth (aged 16-20 at study outset) who provided six waves of data across a 5-year period. Results from multilevel models indicated high, stable rates of IPV victimization across this developmental period (ages 16-25 years) that differed between demographic groups. Overall, 45.2% of LGBT youth were physically abused and 16.9% were sexually victimized by a dating partner during the study. Odds of physical victimization were 76% higher for female than for male LGBT youth, 2.46 times higher for transgender than for cisgender youth, and 2 to 4 times higher for racial-ethnic minorities than for White youth. The prevalence of physical IPV declined with age for White youth but remained stable for racial-ethnic minorities. Odds of sexual victimization were 3.42 times higher for transgender than for cisgender youth, 75% higher for bisexual or questioning than for gay or lesbian youth, and increased more with age for male than female participants. Within-person analyses indicated that odds of physical IPV were higher at times when youth reported more sexual partners, more marijuana use, and lower social support; odds of sexual IPV were higher at times when youth reported more sexual partners and more LGBT-related victimization. In prospective analyses, sexual IPV predicted increased psychological distress; both IPV types marginally predicted increased marijuana use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)912-945
Number of pages34
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Crime Victims
Longitudinal Studies
Transgender Persons
Sexual Partners
Intimate Partner Violence
Sexual Minorities
Cannabis

Keywords

  • LGBT
  • domestic violence
  • youth violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Whitton, Sarah W. ; Newcomb, Michael ; Messinger, Adam M. ; Byck, Gayle ; Mustanski, Brian. / A Longitudinal Study of IPV Victimization Among Sexual Minority Youth. In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence. 2019 ; Vol. 34, No. 5. pp. 912-945.
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A Longitudinal Study of IPV Victimization Among Sexual Minority Youth. / Whitton, Sarah W.; Newcomb, Michael; Messinger, Adam M.; Byck, Gayle; Mustanski, Brian.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 34, No. 5, 01.03.2019, p. 912-945.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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