A Multivoxel Pattern Analysis of Anhedonia During Fear Extinction: Implications for Safety Learning

Benjamin M. Rosenberg*, Vincent Taschereau-Dumouchel, Hakwan Lau, Katherine S. Young, Robin Nusslock, Richard E. Zinbarg, Michelle G. Craske

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Pavlovian learning processes are central to the etiology and treatment of anxiety disorders. Anhedonia and related perturbations in reward processes have been implicated in Pavlovian learning. Associations between anhedonia symptoms and neural indices of Pavlovian learning can inform transdiagnostic associations among depressive and anxiety disorders. Methods: Participants ages 18 to 19 years (67% female) completed a fear extinction (n = 254) and recall (n = 249) paradigm during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Symptom dimensions of general distress (common to anxiety and depression), fears (more specific to anxiety), and anhedonia-apprehension (more specific to depression) were evaluated. We trained whole-brain multivoxel pattern decoders for anhedonia-apprehension during extinction and extinction recall and tested the decoders’ ability to predict anhedonia-apprehension in an external validation sample. Specificity analyses examined effects covarying for general distress and fears. Decoding was repeated within canonical brain networks to highlight candidate neurocircuitry underlying whole-brain effects. Results: Whole-brain decoder training succeeded during both tasks. Prediction of anhedonia-apprehension in the external validation sample was successful for extinction (R2 = 0.047; r = 0.276, p =.002) but not extinction recall (R2 < 0.001, r = −0.063, p =.492). The extinction decoder remained significantly associated with anhedonia-apprehension covarying for fears and general distress (t121 = 3.209, p =.002). Exploratory results highlighted activity in the cognitive control, default mode, limbic, salience, and visual networks related to these effects. Conclusions: Results suggest that patterns of brain activity during extinction, particularly in the cognitive control, default mode, limbic, salience, and visual networks, can be predictive of anhedonia symptoms. Future research should examine associations between anhedonia and extinction, including studies of exposure therapy or positive affect treatments among anhedonic individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBiological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Anhedonia
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Extinction
  • Fear learning
  • fMRI
  • MVPA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

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