A national agenda for Latino cancer prevention and control

Amelie G. Ramirez*, Kipling J. Gallion, Lucina Suarez, Aida L. Giachello, Jose R. Marti, Martha A. Medrano, Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, Gregory A. Talavera, Edward J. Trapido

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and premature death among Latinos, there is limited knowledge of cancer-related issues and priorities of greatest significance to the Latino population, the largest minority group in the nation. This information is vital in helping to guide Latino cancer research, training, and awareness efforts at national, regional, and local levels. To help identify cancer issues of greatest relevance to Latinos, Redes En Acción, The National Hispanic/Latino Cancer Network, a major network among the National Cancer Institute's Special Populations Networks, conducted a survey of 624 key opinion leaders from around the country. Respondents were asked to rank the three cancer sites most important to Latinos in their region and the five issues of greatest significance for this population's cancer prevention and control. Recommendations were prioritized for three specific areas: 1) research, 2) training and/or professional education, and 3) awareness and/or public education. Among cancers, breast carcinoma was ranked number one, followed in order by cervical and lung carcinomas. The issues of greatest significance to Latinos were 1) access to cancer screening and care, 2) tobacco use, 3) patient-doctor communication, 4) nutrition, and 5) risk communication. This survey solicited information from scientists, health care professionals, leaders of government agencies, professional and community-based organizations, and other stakeholders in Latino health. The results laid the foundation for a national Redes En Acción Latino cancer agenda, thus providing a useful tool for individuals and organizations engaged in cancer prevention and control efforts among the Hispanic-Latino population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2209-2215
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume103
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

Keywords

  • Cancer priorities
  • Hispanics
  • Latinos
  • Professional training
  • Public education
  • Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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