A Natural History Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Leonard A. Jason*, Nicole Porter, Jessica Hunnell, Abigail Brown, Alfred Rademaker, Judith A. Richman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: There is a need for natural history chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) studies from random, community-based, multi-ethnic populations. Design: The present study examined the course of CFS from Wave 1 to Wave 2, which spanned over a ten year period of time, and, assessed whether socio-environmental and symptomatology factors were associated with CFS status over the ten year period. Results: There was relative stability over time on critical measures of disability, fatigue, support, optimism and coping over time. One cardinal symptoms of CFS, post-exertional malaise, best differentiated the CFS group from the others. By Wave 2, of the original group of 32 individuals diagnosed with CFS, 4 had died, and 24 were found and agreed to be re-evaluated, and of this group, 16 continued to have CFS, 5 developed exclusionary illnesses, 2 were classified as Idiopathic chronic fatigue, and one had remitted. Conclusions: The current study found that over time in a community-based sample, unbiased by help seeking behavior the CFS group remained rather ill with a variety of different conditions over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-42
Number of pages11
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

Keywords

  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Epidemiology
  • Natural history

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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