A Novel In Situ Experiment to Investigate Wear Mechanisms in Biomaterials

N. Alderete, A. Zaheri, Horacio Dante Espinosa*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A number of experimental techniques have been used to characterize the mechanical properties and wear of biomaterials, from nanoindentation to scratch to atomic force microscopy testing. While all these experiments provide valuable information on the mechanics and functionality of biomaterials (e.g., animals’ teeth), they lack the ability to combine the measurement of force and sliding velocities with high resolution imaging of the processes taking place at the biomaterial-substrate interface. Here we present an experiment for the in situ scanning electron microscopy characterization of the mechanics of friction and wear of biomaterials with simultaneous control of mechanical and kinematic variables. To illustrate the experimental methodology, we report the wear of the sea urchin tooth, which exhibits a unique combination of architecture and material properties tailored to withstand abrasion loads in different directions. By quantifying contact conditions and changes in the tooth tip geometry, we show that the developed methodology provides a versatile and promising tool to investigate wear mechanisms in a variety of animal teeth accounting for microscale effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalExperimental Mechanics
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Biomaterials
Wear of materials
Mechanics
Animals
Experiments
Nanoindentation
Abrasion
Atomic force microscopy
Materials properties
Kinematics
Friction
Imaging techniques
Mechanical properties
Scanning electron microscopy
Geometry
Testing
Substrates

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • In situ experimentation
  • Wear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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title = "A Novel In Situ Experiment to Investigate Wear Mechanisms in Biomaterials",
abstract = "A number of experimental techniques have been used to characterize the mechanical properties and wear of biomaterials, from nanoindentation to scratch to atomic force microscopy testing. While all these experiments provide valuable information on the mechanics and functionality of biomaterials (e.g., animals’ teeth), they lack the ability to combine the measurement of force and sliding velocities with high resolution imaging of the processes taking place at the biomaterial-substrate interface. Here we present an experiment for the in situ scanning electron microscopy characterization of the mechanics of friction and wear of biomaterials with simultaneous control of mechanical and kinematic variables. To illustrate the experimental methodology, we report the wear of the sea urchin tooth, which exhibits a unique combination of architecture and material properties tailored to withstand abrasion loads in different directions. By quantifying contact conditions and changes in the tooth tip geometry, we show that the developed methodology provides a versatile and promising tool to investigate wear mechanisms in a variety of animal teeth accounting for microscale effects.",
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A Novel In Situ Experiment to Investigate Wear Mechanisms in Biomaterials. / Alderete, N.; Zaheri, A.; Espinosa, Horacio Dante.

In: Experimental Mechanics, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - A number of experimental techniques have been used to characterize the mechanical properties and wear of biomaterials, from nanoindentation to scratch to atomic force microscopy testing. While all these experiments provide valuable information on the mechanics and functionality of biomaterials (e.g., animals’ teeth), they lack the ability to combine the measurement of force and sliding velocities with high resolution imaging of the processes taking place at the biomaterial-substrate interface. Here we present an experiment for the in situ scanning electron microscopy characterization of the mechanics of friction and wear of biomaterials with simultaneous control of mechanical and kinematic variables. To illustrate the experimental methodology, we report the wear of the sea urchin tooth, which exhibits a unique combination of architecture and material properties tailored to withstand abrasion loads in different directions. By quantifying contact conditions and changes in the tooth tip geometry, we show that the developed methodology provides a versatile and promising tool to investigate wear mechanisms in a variety of animal teeth accounting for microscale effects.

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