A Novel Technique to Reject Artifact Components for Surface EMG Signals Recorded During Walking With Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation: A Pilot Study

Minjae Kim, Yaejin Moon, Jasmine Hunt, Kelly A. McKenzie, Adam Horin, Matt McGuire, Keehoon Kim, Levi J. Hargrove, Arun Jayaraman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Transcutaneous spinal cord electrical stimulation (tSCS) is an emerging technology that targets to restore functionally integrated neuromuscular control of gait. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a novel filtering method, Artifact Component Specific Rejection (ACSR), for removing artifacts induced by tSCS from surface electromyogram (sEMG) data for investigation of muscle response during walking when applying spinal stimulation. Both simulated and real tSCS contaminated sEMG data from six stroke survivors were processed using ACSR and notch filtering, respectively. The performance of the filters was evaluated with data collected in various conditions (e.g., simulated artifacts contaminating sEMG in multiple degrees, various tSCS intensities in five lower-limb muscles of six participants). In the simulation test, after applying the ACSR filter, the contaminated-signal was well matched with the original signal, showing a high correlation (r = 0.959) and low amplitude difference (normalized root means square error = 0.266) between them. In the real tSCS contaminated data, the ACSR filter showed superior performance on reducing the artifacts (96% decrease) over the notch filter (25% decrease). These results indicate that ACSR filtering is capable of eliminating artifacts from sEMG collected during tSCS application, improving the precision of quantitative analysis of muscle activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number660583
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume15
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 3 2021

Keywords

  • artifact removal
  • electrical stimulation
  • neurorehabilitation
  • signal assessment
  • surface electromyography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Novel Technique to Reject Artifact Components for Surface EMG Signals Recorded During Walking With Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation: A Pilot Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this