A personality profile of patients diagnosed with post–polio syndrome

Kimberly Clark, Steven Dinsmore, Jordan Grafman*, Marinos C. Dalakas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Post-polio syndrome (PPS) refers to the late development of new neuromuscular symptoms in previously stable poliomyelitis patients. Whether psychological disturbance plays a role in the manifestation of symptoms in these patients is unclear. We examined 22 patients fulfilling the clinical criteria for PPS with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-II (MMPI-II), Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scales, Chapman and Chapman Psychosis-Proneness Scales, Fatigue Scales, a neurobehavioral rating scale, and Cognitive Symptoms Self-Report Scales. The overwhelming majority of scale scores were within normal limits, and there was no indication that psychopathologic symptoms were associated with the development or severity of new muscle weakness in PPS patients. Women with PPS had significantly more somatic complaints, but were less socially isolated than men with PPS. This study confirms that the development or severity of new muscle weakness in carefully diagnosed PPS patients is not due to, or influenced by, underlying psychopathology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1809-1811
Number of pages3
JournalNeurology
Volume44
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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