A phase 2 trial of guselkumab versus adalimumab for plaque psoriasis

Kenneth B. Gordon, Kristina Callis Duffin, Robert Bissonnette, Jörg C. Prinz, Yasmine Wasfi, Shu Li, Yaung Kaung Shen, Philippe Szapary, Bruce Randazzo, Kristian Reich*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

186 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND Little is known about the effect of specific anti-interleukin-23 therapy, as compared with established anti-tumor necrosis factor therapies, for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. METHODS In a 52-week, phase 2, dose-ranging, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, active-comparator trial, we compared guselkumab (CNTO 1959), an anti-interleukin-23 monoclonal antibody, with adalimumab in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. A total of 293 patients were randomly assigned to receive guselkumab (5 mg at weeks 0 and 4 and every 12 weeks thereafter, 15 mg every 8 weeks, 50 mg at weeks 0 and 4 and every 12 weeks thereafter, 100 mg every 8 weeks, or 200 mg at weeks 0 and 4 and every 12 weeks thereafter) through week 40, placebo, or adalimumab (standard dosage for psoriasis). At week 16, patients in the placebo group crossed over to receive guselkumab at a dose of 100 mg every 8 weeks. The primary end point was the proportion of patients with a Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) score of 0 (indicating cleared psoriasis) or 1 (indicating minimal psoriasis) at week 16. RESULTS At week 16, the proportion of patients with a PGA score of 0 or 1 was significantly higher in each guselkumab group than in the placebo group: 34% in the 5-mg group, 61% in the 15-mg group, 79% in the 50-mg group, 86% in the 100-mg group, and 83% in the 200-mg group, as compared with 7% in the placebo group (P≤0.002 for all comparisons). Moreover, the proportion was significantly higher in the 50-mg, 100-mg, and 200-mg guselkumab groups than in the adalimumab group (58%) (P<0.05 for all comparisons). At week 16, the proportion of patients with at least a 75% improvement in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index scores was significantly higher in each guselkumab group than in the placebo group (P<0.001 for all comparisons). At week 40, the proportion of patients with a PGA score of 0 or 1 remained significantly higher in the 50-mg, 100-mg, and 200-mg guselkumab groups than in the adalimumab group (71%, 77%, and 81%, respectively, vs. 49%) (P<0.05 for all comparisons). Between week 0 and week 16, infections were observed in 20% of the patients in the guselkumab groups, 12% in the adalimumab group, and 14% in the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS The results of this phase 2 trial suggest that guselkumab may be an effective therapy for plaque psoriasis and that control of psoriasis can be achieved with specific anti-interleukin-23 therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-144
Number of pages9
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume373
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 9 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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