A pilot study evaluating adaptive closed-loop fluid resuscitation during states of absolute and relative hypovolemia in dogs

Behnood Gholami*, Wassim M. Haddad, James M. Bailey, Beth Geist, Yukie Ueyama, William W. Muir

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate and determine the performance of a partially automated as well as a fully automated closed-loop fluid resuscitation system during states of absolute and relative hypovolemia. Design: Prospective experimental trial. Setting: Research laboratory. Animals: Five adult Beagle dogs. Methods: Isoflurane anesthetized mechanically ventilated dogs were subjected to absolute hypovolemia (controlled: 2 trials; uncontrolled: 3 trials), relative hypovolemia (2 trials), and the combination of relative and absolute controlled hypovolemia (2 trials). Controlled and uncontrolled hypovolemia were produced by withdrawing blood from the carotid or femoral artery. Relative hypovolemia was produced by increasing the isoflurane concentration (1 trial) or by infusion of intravenous sodium nitroprusside (1 trial). Relative hypovolemia combined with controlled absolute hypovolemia was produced by increasing the isoflurane concentration (1 trial) and infusion of IV sodium nitroprusside (1 trial). Hemodynamic parameters including stroke volume variation (SVV) were continuously monitored and recorded in all dogs. A proprietary closed-loop fluid administration system based on fluid distribution and compartmental dynamical systems administered a continuous infusion of lactated Ringers solution in order to restore and maintain SVV to a predetermined target value. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 9 experiments were performed on 5 dogs. Hemodynamic parameters deteriorated and SVV increased during controlled or uncontrolled hypovolemia, relative hypovolemia, and during relative hypovolemia combined with controlled hypovolemia. Stroke volume variation was restored to baseline values during closed-loop fluid infusion. Conclusions: Closed-loop fluid administration based on IV fluid distribution and compartmental dynamical systems can be used to provide goal directed fluid therapy during absolute or relative hypovolemia in mechanically ventilated isoflurane anesthetized dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)436-446
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adaptive control
  • fluid resuscitation
  • fluid therapy
  • hemodynamic monitoring
  • shock

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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