A pilot study of using crowds in the classroom

Steven Dow, Elizabeth Gerber, Audris Wong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

Industry relies on higher education to prepare students for careers in innovation. Fulfilling this obligation is especially difficult in classroom settings, which often lack authentic interaction with the outside world. Online crowdsourcing has the potential to change this. Our research explores if and how online crowds can support student learning in the classroom. We explore how scalable, diverse, immediate (and often ambiguous and conflicting) input from online crowds affects student learning and motivation for project-based innovation work. In a pilot study with three classrooms, we explore interactions with the crowd at four key stages of the innovation process: needfinding, ideating, testing, and pitching. Students reported that online crowds helped them quickly and inexpensively identify needs and uncover issues with early-stage prototypes, although they favored face-to-face interactions for more contextual feedback. We share early evidence and discuss implications for creating a socio-technical infrastructure to more effectively use crowdsourcing in education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI 2013
Subtitle of host publicationChanging Perspectives, Conference Proceedings - The 31st Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Pages227-236
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2013
Event31st Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Changing Perspectives, CHI 2013 - Paris, France
Duration: Apr 27 2013May 2 2013

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Other

Other31st Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: Changing Perspectives, CHI 2013
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period4/27/135/2/13

Keywords

  • Crowdsourcing
  • Education
  • Feedback
  • Innovation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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  • Cite this

    Dow, S., Gerber, E., & Wong, A. (2013). A pilot study of using crowds in the classroom. In CHI 2013: Changing Perspectives, Conference Proceedings - The 31st Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 227-236). (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1145/2470654.2470686