A prediction-based real-time scheduling advisor

Peter A Dinda*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

The real-time scheduling advisor (RTSA) is an entirely user-level system that an application running on a typical shared, unreserved distributed computing environment can turn to for advice on how to schedule its compute-bound soft real-time tasks. Given a list of hosts, a description of the CPU demands of the task, the deadline, and a confidence level, the RTSA will recommend one of the hosts and predict, as a confidence interval, the running time of the task on that host. The RTSA is based on a scalable and extensible shared resource prediction system based on statistical time series analysis. The author first describes how the RTSA builds on this underlying system to provide its service, and then he evaluates its performance using a randomized methodology based on real background workloads, determining the effect of different factors. He also compares it with a random approach and a measurement-based approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium, IPDPS 2002
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages88-95
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)0769515738, 9780769515731
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Event16th International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium, IPDPS 2002 - Ft. Lauderdale, United States
Duration: Apr 15 2002Apr 19 2002

Publication series

NameProceedings - International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium, IPDPS 2002

Other

Other16th International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium, IPDPS 2002
CountryUnited States
CityFt. Lauderdale
Period4/15/024/19/02

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Modeling and Simulation

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