A Qualitative Study of Filial Piety Among Community Dwelling, Chinese, Older Adults: Changing Meaning and Impact on Health and Well-Being

XinQi Dong, E. Shien Chang, Esther Wong, Melissa Simon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigates the construct of filial piety and its impact on the health and well-being of U.S. Chinese older adults. Based on semistructured interview data with 39 community-dwelling, Chinese older adults in Chicago's Chinatown, this community-based participatory research study suggests existing disconnections between older adults' conceptualizations of filial piety and the receipt of filial care. Our data suggest older adults mitigate tension by prioritizing immigrant families' socioeconomic mobility. However, filial care discrepancy may be detrimental to their health and well-being. This study has implications for the provision of culturally appropriate health care services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-146
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Intergenerational Relationships
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Keywords

  • U.S. Chinese population
  • aging
  • intergenerational relationships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Archaeology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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