A randomized study of the effects of mindfulness training on psychological well-being and symptoms of stress in patients treated for cancer at 6-month follow-up

Richard Bränström*, Pia Kvillemo, Judith Tedlie Moskowitz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: There is increasing evidence showing beneficial effects of mindfulness and mindfulness training on various indicators of mental and physical health. Purpose: This paper reports the 6-month follow-up effects of a mindfulness stress reduction training program among patients treated for cancer on perceived stress, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, positive states of mind, coping self-efficacy, and mindfulness. Methods: Patients with a previous cancer diagnosis were recruited and randomized into an intervention group or a waiting list control group. The intervention consisted of an 8-week mindfulness training course. Results: Compared to participants in the control group, the intervention group showed a larger increase in mindfulness at 6-month follow-up. However, there were no differences on any of the other outcomes between the intervention and control groups. Continued meditation practice was associated with a significant reduction in post-traumatic stress symptoms of avoidance. Conclusions: The study draws attention to the need to better understand the mechanisms behind the effect of mindfulness training and to potential modification of mindfulness interventions to promote sustained benefits over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)535-542
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Depression
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
  • Perceived stress
  • Stress reduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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