A review of empirical evidence on gender differences in nonland agricultural inputs, technology, and services in developing countries

Amber Peterman*, Julia Andrea Behrman, Agnes R. Quisumbing

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

Empirical research on gender dimensions in agricultural inputs has focused on land. This chapter reviews existing microeconomic empirical literature from the past 10 years on gender differences in use, access, and adoption of nonland agricultural inputs in developing countries. The review focuses on three key areas: (1) technological resources, (2) natural resources, and (3) human resources. In general, there has been more empirical research on inorganic fertilizer, seed varieties, and extension services than on tools and mechanization and life-cycle effects, and most of the studies are from Sub-Saharan Africa. A consistent finding is that, across different types of inputs, men generally have higher input measures than women, and that this input gap is responsible for observed productivity differences between men and women; however, this finding is often sensitive to the use of models that control for other background factors, as well as the type of gender indicator implemented in the analysis. The final section presents future directions, opportunities, and recommendations for microeconomic gender analysis of nonland agricultural inputs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGender in Agriculture
Subtitle of host publicationClosing the Knowledge Gap
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages145-186
Number of pages42
ISBN (Electronic)9789401786164
ISBN (Print)9789401786157
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Access to farm inputs
  • Agriculture
  • Assets
  • Gender
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

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