A review of empirically supported psychosocial interventions for pain and adherence outcomes in sickle cell disease

Edith Chen*, Steve W. Cole, Pamela M. Kato

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To review empirical studies of psychological interventions for pain and adherence outcomes among patients with sickle cell disease. Method: We conducted a literature review of studies using psychological interventions targeted at pain and/or adherence behaviors related to sickle cell disease. The American Psychological Association Division 12 Task Force criteria (Chambless criteria) were used to evaluate the empirical support for three categories of interventions (cognitive-behavioral techniques, interventions aimed at behavioral change, and social support interventions). Results: A small number of intervention studies met criteria for demonstrating empirical efficacy. As a group, cognitive-behavioral techniques fall into the category of probably efficacious for sickle cell pain. Other intervention types were limited by inadequate research methodologies. Conclusions: Future studies will need to more stringently test outcomes related to acute crises (e.g., pain episodes) as well as day-to-day management of sickle cell disease to clarify the most efficacious intervention approaches. Implications and suggestions for future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-209
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004

Keywords

  • Intervention
  • Psychosocial
  • Sickle cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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