A Social History of Iranian Cinema: The Islamicate Period, 1978–1984

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

In Volume 3, Naficy assesses the profound effects of the Islamic Revolution on Iran's cinema and film industry. Throughout the book, he uses the term Islamicate, rather than Islamic, to indicate that the values of the postrevolutionary state, culture, and cinema were informed not only by Islam but also by Persian traditions. Naficy examines documentary films made to record events prior to, during, and in the immediate aftermath of the revolution. He describes how certain institutions and individuals, including prerevolutionary cinema and filmmakers, were associated with the Pahlavi regime, the West, and modernity and therefore perceived as corrupt and immoral. Many of the nation's moviehouses were burned down. Prerevolutionary films were subject to strict review and often banned, to be replaced with films commensurate with Islamicate values. Filmmakers and entertainers were thrown out of the industry, exiled, imprisoned, and even executed. Yet, out of this revolutionary turmoil, an extraordinary Islamicate cinema and film culture emerged. Naficy traces its development and explains how Iran's long war with Iraq, the gendered segregation of space, and the imposition of the veil on women encouraged certain ideological and aesthetic trends in film and related media. Finally, he discusses the structural, administrative, and regulatory measures that helped to institutionalize the new evolving cinema.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherDuke University Press Books
Volume3
Edition1
ISBN (Print)0822348772
StatePublished - 2012

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Social History
Cinema
Revolution
Filmmaker
Iran
Imposition
Segregation
Islam
Film Industry
Documentary Film
Modernity
Industry
Entertainers
Aesthetics
Film Culture
Iraq
Veil

Cite this

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A Social History of Iranian Cinema : The Islamicate Period, 1978–1984. / Naficy, Hamid.

1 ed. Duke University Press Books, 2012.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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