A survey of paediatricians on the use of electrocardiogram for pre-participation sports screening

Angira Patel*, Gregory Webster, Kendra Ward, John Lantos

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Aim The aim of the present study was to determine general paediatrician knowledge, practices, and attitudes towards electrocardiogram (ECG) screening in school athletes during pre-participation screening exam (PPSE). Methods Paediatricians affiliated with a tertiary children's hospital completed a survey about ECGs for PPSE. Results In total, 205/498 (41%) responded; 92% of the paediatricians did not include an ECG as part of PPSE; 56% were aware of a case in which a student athlete in their own community had died of sudden unexplained death; 4% had an athlete in their practice die. Only 16% of paediatricians perform all 12 American Heart Association recommended elements of the PPSE. If any of these screening elements are abnormal, 69% obtain an ECG, 36% an echocardiogram, and 30% restrict patients from sports activity; 73% of them refer the patient to a cardiologist. Conclusion Most of the general paediatricians surveyed did not currently perform ECGs for PPSE. In addition, there was a low rate of adherence to performing the 12 screening elements recommended by the American Heart Association. They have trouble obtaining timely, accurate ECG interpretations, worry about potential unnecessary exercise restrictions, and cost-effectiveness. The practical hurdles to ECG implementation emphasise the need for a fresh look at PPSE, and not just ECG screening. Improvements in ECG performance/interpretation would be necessary for ECGs to be a useful part of PPSE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)884-889
Number of pages6
JournalCardiology in the Young
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Sports
Electrocardiography
Athletes
Surveys and Questionnaires
Pediatricians
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Sudden Death
Tertiary Care Centers
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Exercise
Students

Keywords

  • Electrocardiogram
  • paediatrician
  • screening
  • survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "A survey of paediatricians on the use of electrocardiogram for pre-participation sports screening",
abstract = "Aim The aim of the present study was to determine general paediatrician knowledge, practices, and attitudes towards electrocardiogram (ECG) screening in school athletes during pre-participation screening exam (PPSE). Methods Paediatricians affiliated with a tertiary children's hospital completed a survey about ECGs for PPSE. Results In total, 205/498 (41{\%}) responded; 92{\%} of the paediatricians did not include an ECG as part of PPSE; 56{\%} were aware of a case in which a student athlete in their own community had died of sudden unexplained death; 4{\%} had an athlete in their practice die. Only 16{\%} of paediatricians perform all 12 American Heart Association recommended elements of the PPSE. If any of these screening elements are abnormal, 69{\%} obtain an ECG, 36{\%} an echocardiogram, and 30{\%} restrict patients from sports activity; 73{\%} of them refer the patient to a cardiologist. Conclusion Most of the general paediatricians surveyed did not currently perform ECGs for PPSE. In addition, there was a low rate of adherence to performing the 12 screening elements recommended by the American Heart Association. They have trouble obtaining timely, accurate ECG interpretations, worry about potential unnecessary exercise restrictions, and cost-effectiveness. The practical hurdles to ECG implementation emphasise the need for a fresh look at PPSE, and not just ECG screening. Improvements in ECG performance/interpretation would be necessary for ECGs to be a useful part of PPSE.",
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A survey of paediatricians on the use of electrocardiogram for pre-participation sports screening. / Patel, Angira; Webster, Gregory; Ward, Kendra; Lantos, John.

In: Cardiology in the Young, Vol. 27, No. 5, 01.07.2017, p. 884-889.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AB - Aim The aim of the present study was to determine general paediatrician knowledge, practices, and attitudes towards electrocardiogram (ECG) screening in school athletes during pre-participation screening exam (PPSE). Methods Paediatricians affiliated with a tertiary children's hospital completed a survey about ECGs for PPSE. Results In total, 205/498 (41%) responded; 92% of the paediatricians did not include an ECG as part of PPSE; 56% were aware of a case in which a student athlete in their own community had died of sudden unexplained death; 4% had an athlete in their practice die. Only 16% of paediatricians perform all 12 American Heart Association recommended elements of the PPSE. If any of these screening elements are abnormal, 69% obtain an ECG, 36% an echocardiogram, and 30% restrict patients from sports activity; 73% of them refer the patient to a cardiologist. Conclusion Most of the general paediatricians surveyed did not currently perform ECGs for PPSE. In addition, there was a low rate of adherence to performing the 12 screening elements recommended by the American Heart Association. They have trouble obtaining timely, accurate ECG interpretations, worry about potential unnecessary exercise restrictions, and cost-effectiveness. The practical hurdles to ECG implementation emphasise the need for a fresh look at PPSE, and not just ECG screening. Improvements in ECG performance/interpretation would be necessary for ECGs to be a useful part of PPSE.

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