A synthetic lethality screen reveals ING5 as a genetic dependency of catalytically dead Set1A/COMPASS in mouse embryonic stem cells

Bercin K. Cenik, Christie C. Sze, Caila A. Ryan, Siddhartha Das, Kaixiang Cao, Delphine Douillet, Emily J. Rendleman, Didi Zha, Nabiha Haleema Khan, Elizabeth Bartom, Ali Shilatifard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are defined by their ability to self-renew and the potential to differentiate into all tissues of the developing organism. We previously demonstrated that deleting the catalytic SET domain of the Set1A/complex of proteins associated with SET1 histone methyltransferase (Set1A/COMPASS) in mouse ESCs does not impair their viability or ability to self-renew; however, it leads to defects in differentiation. The precise mechanisms by which Set1A executes these functions remain to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that mice lacking the SET domain of Set1A are embryonic lethal at a stage that is unique from null alleles. To gain insight into Set1A function in regulating pluripotency, we conducted a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated dropout screen and identified the MOZ/MORF (monocytic leukaemia zinc finger protein/monocytic leukaemia zinc finger protein-related factor) and HBO1 (HAT bound to ORC1) acetyltransferase complex member ING5 as a synthetic perturbation to Set1A. The loss of Ing5 in Set1AΔSET mouse ESCs decreases the fitness of these cells, and the simultaneous loss of ING5 and in Set1AΔSET leads to up-regulation of differentiation-associated genes. Taken together, our results point toward Set1A/COMPASS and ING5 as potential coregulators of the self-renewal and differentiation status of ESCs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2118385119
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume119
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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