A systematic review of behavioral intervention technologies for youth with chronic health conditions and physical and intellectual disabilities: Implications for adolescents and young adults with spina bifida

Colleen Stiles-Shields*, Autumn N. Crowe, Colleen F. Bechtel Driscoll, Diana M. Ohanian, Alexa Stern, Elicia Wartman, Adrien M. Winning, Q. Eileen Wafford, Emily G. Lattie, Grayson N. Holmbeck

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective Behavioral intervention technologies (BITs) stand as a promising delivery mechanism that overcomes multiple condition-specific and access barriers for self-management interventions for adolescents and young adults with spina bifida (AYA-SB). The purpose of the current review was to synthesize the behavioral and self-management intervention literature in conditions that have overlapping symptoms with youth with SB and to develop a model of likely user needs for AYA-SB that promotes self-management. Method The search strategy was conducted by a medical research librarian in the following databases: MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Elsevier), PsycINFO (EbscoHost), the Cochrane Library (Wiley), and Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) databases. The review was based on a systematic narrative synthesis framework and adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines (registration number CRD42018092342). Results In total, 18 articles were included in the current BIT review. The majority of included studies (1) targeted the management of chronic health conditions, (2) were informed by evidence-based approaches, (3) relied on content delivery, (4) were Web-based, (5) used linear or user-driven workflows, (6) included professional human support, and (7) included a control condition. Conclusions Many of the evaluated BITs resulted in acceptable usage and maintained or improved targeted symptoms. A user needs model for AYA-SB is proposed with the intention that future research will promote further refinement and ultimate deployment of a BIT for AYA-SB to promote self-management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-362
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Keywords

  • AYA
  • Behavioral intervention technologies
  • Chronic health
  • Intellectual disability
  • Physical disability
  • Self-management
  • Spina bifida

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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