A systems physiology instructional environment for biomedical engineers: A design grounded in the learning sciences

D. E. Kanter*, Brian Reiser, John B Troy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

To the extent that Biomedical Engineering (BME) is rooted in the biological and medical sciences, a core Systems Physiology course provides undergraduates with an important learning opportunity. However, the rapid evolution of BME's biological and medical foundations necessitates that beyond learning systems physiology's content and concepts, pre-professionals must learn to apply relevant aspects of systems physiology to unanticipated new tasks. The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology's EC-2000 criteria similarly support engineers learning to apply their knowledge. This paper describes a principled approach by which we are designing a BME instructional environment in which students learn systems physiology subject matter coupled to its application. We explain how our design principles for this instructional environment evolved from the Project-based Science pedagogical framework and a modern understanding of how people learn, and further discuss our process of participatory design, which involves individuals from both BME and the Learning Sciences. We present our progress to date, and the ideas we have distilled from this experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1219-1228
Number of pages10
JournalASEE Annual Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Event2001 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Peppers, Papers, Pueblos and Professors - Albuquerque, NM, United States
Duration: Jun 24 2001Jun 27 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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