A tutorial in consumer research: Knowledge creation and knowledge appreciation in deductive-conceptual consumer research

Chris Janiszewski, Aparna A. Labroo, Derek D. Rucker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

A typical article in a top-tier business journal can require as much as $400,000 in academic labor costs (Terwiesch and Ulrich 2014). This estimate raises the question of what makes a contribution worthy of such a significant financial investment. How does an academic community determine the value of a contribution? We propose that two criteria inform judgments of value: the amount of knowledge creation and the amount of knowledge appreciation. Implicit in our view is the idea that researchers should know how to create valuable knowledge and be able to anticipate how much stakeholders will appreciate that knowledge. In this tutorial, we discuss knowledge creation, knowledge appreciation, and a framework that jointly represents these two sources of value. We hope that this framework will encourage scholars to engage in research activities that are valued by the scientific community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-209
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Consumer Research
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Philosophy of science
  • Theory building
  • Theory testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

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