Academic outcomes in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

Frank Zelko*, Dean Beebe, Aimee Baker, Shannen M. Nelson, Aisha Ali, Adlin Cedeno, Blair Dina, Marisa S. Klein-Gitelman, Jun Ying, Hermine I. Brunner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To explore academic outcomes in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) and their relationship to variables such as demographic and socioeconomic status, neurocognitive functioning, behavioral/emotional adjustment, and cSLE disease status. Methods Forty pairs of children diagnosed with cSLE and healthy best friend controls were rated by parents on a standardized scale of school competence. Information about participants' demographic and socioeconomic status was obtained, along with measures of cSLE disease activity and damage. All of the participants received formal neurocognitive testing and were also rated on standardized scales of behavioral/emotional adjustment and executive functioning. Results Compared to healthy controls, school competence was rated as lower in the cSLE group, although the groups did not differ significantly on indices of cognitive, behavioral, emotional, or executive functioning. School competence ratings were correlated with reading and mathematics achievement test scores in both groups, and with ratings of mental self-regulation in the cSLE group. School competence ratings were correlated with measures of cSLE disease activity and treatment intensity. Conclusion cSLE is associated with inferior parent-rated academic outcomes compared to those noted in demographically-matched peers, despite similar neurocognitive function. The adverse academic outcomes that distinguish children with cSLE from their demographically-matched peers appear to be mediated by SLE disease activity and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1167-1174
Number of pages8
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume64
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Academic outcomes in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Zelko, F., Beebe, D., Baker, A., Nelson, S. M., Ali, A., Cedeno, A., Dina, B., Klein-Gitelman, M. S., Ying, J., & Brunner, H. I. (2012). Academic outcomes in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus. Arthritis Care and Research, 64(8), 1167-1174. https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.21681